I am a regular reader of the SCOTUSblog. It is THE resource for things going on at the U.S. Supreme Court.

While reading it this morning I learned of a Petition for Writ of Certiorari 1 that demonstrates the utterly ridiculous nature of central planning.

The case involves apparently conflicting federal statutes. One of the statutes provides preferences in a federal bidding process to companies “owned and controlled by veterans.” The other “directs the federal government to acquire certain goods and services exclusively from nonprofit entities that employ blind and severely disabled individuals.”

I do not want to leave out any of the subtlety or nuance, so here is the complete description of the issues from SCOTUSblog:

(1) Whether the Tucker Act’s grant of bid-protest jurisdiction to the Court of Federal Claims extends to suits that challenge the lawfulness of a federal agency’s acquisition policies and practices, and their underlying statutory foundation, outside the context of a specific solicitation regarding, or the award of, a government contract; and (2) whether Congress intended 38 U.S.C. § 8127(d)’s competitive-bidding preference for providers owned and controlled by veterans to trump the mandatory requirements of the Javits-Wagner-O’Day Act, which directs the federal government to acquire certain goods and services exclusively from nonprofit entities that employ blind and severely disabled individuals, that dictate that agencies must acquire goods and services in the first instance using the AbilityOne Procurement List.

How about this? Congress stops to trying to benefit certain groups over others.

The end.

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  1. Which is the formal, legal, pretentious, Latin way of saying “a request for the Supreme Court to overrule the lower court where I lost.”