Pursuant to the instructions issued by the Libertarian Party of Colorado at its most recent state convention to those wishing to be delegates at the national convention in New Orleans, I recorded all of my votes for future inspection. There is no need to wait for future inspection. You can inspect them now.

I started trying to tweet them all extemporaneously. But when the motions and resolutions came fast and furious 1 I abandoned that endeavor and scribbled them down in my notebook. To the best I can decipher my poultry markings, here they are. You can check out my tweets @BlueCarp. Follow me there, regardless. 🙂

And away we go…

 

Day One: July 1, 2018

I shuffled into the Celestin Hall at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans about 45 minutes late. Fortunately, given Libertarian time, I did not miss anything. The Bylaws Committee was giving its report. I voted in favor of a Motion to Suspend the Rules (hereinafter “MSR”) so the Bylaws Committee could do something out of order. It passed by voice vote.

I voted in favor of the Bylaw Committee’s Proposal A, as far as I can tell from my notes.

The convention then took up the issue of closing the “back door” to prevent amending the Statement of Principles by at least a 7/8 supermajority. I voted “no” to ending debate on the matter, but I lost. Debate ended. I voted “no” to the proposal, and I lost again. The proposal passed. Why? A mere majority does not frighten me. Less than a 7/8 supermajority certainly does not. It is as someone is overcompensating for something. I do not feel the need to overcompensate. For that.

I abstained on the next MSR to discuss Bylaw Committee Proposition V. And by “abstained” I mean I did not figure out was happening until the voice vote was over. The MSR failed.

I voted “aye” on Bylaw Committee Proposition B. It passed.

I abstained on the MSR to go to Proposition L. It failed. I voted “aye” on the next MSR to go to Proposition N. It failed. I hope you can feel the excitement on these votes.

Next was a discussion of the “token” system used to vote for the discussion of deletion of platform planks. Some wanted to do away with it. I voted to keep it. We kept it. I am pretty sure.

Then we discussed Proposition C from the Bylaws Committee. I voted to close debate, and we did. I voted “aye” and it passed.

Proposition D dealt with regional alternates to the Libertarian National Committee. I voted “aye.” It passed.

Proposition E was about deleting redundancies in the bylaws. I voted “aye” to close debate and in favor of the proposal. It passed.

We then got to Proposition P 2 involving reorganizing our Purpose Statement. I voted against ending debate and we did not. I then voted “nay” on a MSR to allow an amendment and that MSR failed. There was a motion to extend debate five more minutes. I voted “nay” and we did not. Then we voted on if we should vote on the actual proposal, I said “aye.” Most people said “nay.” We did not vote. There was discussion about removing the words “in America” from the bylaw. We voted to close debate and I agreed. I voted “aye” on the proposal and it passed. Somehow we were not done with it yet. There was a proposal to revise the preamble. I noted that Caryn Ann Harlos opposed it and so did I. There was a motion to extend debate five minutes. I said “no.” The motion failed. There was a motion to accept the amendment. I voted “nay.” It passed anyway. We finally voted on the actual proposal as amended. I opposed it. It passed regardless.

There was a MSR to take up Proposition L. I voted “nay.” It passed. I voted “aye” on the actual Proposition, and it passed.

Another MSR was next, this time to take up Proposition I. I voted “nay.” It failed.

There was a long discussion on Proposal F. I voted in favor of postponing it indefinitely. We postponed it indefinitely.

Next was Proposition I to make the Judicial Committee a four year term. I voted “aye.” It passed.

We then moved to the Platform reports.

Our plank on abortion, 1.5, got enough tokens to consider deleting it. I voted “nay” on deleting it. So did just about everyone else. It stayed.

Moving right along… I voted “nay” on a MSR to take up Proposal N. It passed anyway. Proposal N involved deleting the last sentence somewhere. I could not keep up. Or I saw something shiny somewhere. There was another MSR to allow hearing more than one minority report from the Platform Committee. I voted “nay.” It passed nevertheless. I think I see a pattern developing. Then someone wanted to allow ranked choice voting on the multiple minority reports. I voted “nay.” Thankfully so did most of the rest of the convention. Then there was yet another MSR involving how we were going to deal with multiple minority reports. I said “nay.” The chair said it passed. Someone called for division. We had a standing vote. I voted “nay” again and the MSR failed following the count. And we had yet another MSR, this time to allow approval voting on the minority reports. I said “nay.” It failed. The ruling of the chair was appealed. I voted to uphold the ruling. The ruling was upheld.  Then we had another MSR, this time regarding moving the order of discussion. I said “aye.” It failed anyway.

There was a motion to adjourn at 4:25 instead of 4:00. I voted “aye.” It failed. The majority report on whatever we were discussing at the time recommended removing a sentence. The first minority report wanted to add the word “individual” somewhere. The second minority report wanted to do something else. After debate on the majority report to delete the sentence. I voted “nay.” It passed anyway.

We then discussed Proposal AA regarding parental rights. I voted to end debate and we did. There was an amendment proposed. I said “nay” and it passed anyway.

Someone proposed an MSR to vote on Proposal G. I voted “no” and the MSR failed.

On Proposition A, regarding occupational licensing, I voted “aye.” It passed.

If we did anything else on Day One, I missed it.

 

Day Two: July 2, 2018

We started out in the morning discussing a new plank on sex work. 3 There was an amendment to change the word “persons” to “adults.” I voted “aye” and it passed. We had two consecutive MSRs on something or another. I voted “nay” on both and neither passed. On the vote to adopt the new plank on sex work, I voted “aye” and it passed.

We then discussed plank 1.4 “Personal Relationships.” The majority report wanted to add a the phrase “number of participants” to what we do not think was any of the the government’s business. The minority report was down with that but also wanted to add a section making it clear that government licensing of personal relationships is bogus. I voted for the minority report. It won. But that just meant now we could debate the minority report. I voted “nay” on the motion to end debate, but the motion carried. I then voted “nay” on the plank, but only because some people wanted to propose an amendment and the only way to do that was to vote it down. But the plank passed, which was cool with me. 4

Next, we discussed plank 1.7 “Crime and Justice.” First, we had to decide if we were going to debate the majority or the minority report. Once again, there was a motion to end debate. I said “no.” Debate ended nonetheless. I voted for the majority report and the majority report won out. I voted to end debate on the following discussion and it passed. Now we voted on whether or not to adopt the plank. I voted “aye,” but it was defeated so people could propose amendments. There was a motion to divide the question regarding adding the word “criminal.” I voted against adding the word, because the government can screw with you in a variety of ways classified as “civil.” 5 The word “criminal” was not added. The second part of the divided question dealt with adding a sentence to the end of the plank. I voted “aye” and it passed.

Whatever we discussed with next dealt with deleting the prefatory language “Libertarians believe that…” I voted “aye” and it passed. Then we discussed adding the language “between adults.” I voted “aye” but it failed. I voted “aye” on adopting the amended plank and it passed.

Next, I voted “aye” on a MSR to discuss Proposal L. It passed.

Proposal L dealt with 2.6 and monetary policy. The proposal was to make it clear we oppose student loan subsidies (because they drive up the cost of college education) and the special bankruptcy laws that surround them. I voted to consider the majority report and that passed. A motion to extend debate and to add another sentence was made. I voted “aye” but it failed. We voted on the plank as amended. I voted “aye” and it passed.

A MSR to consider a new plank was made. I voted “nay” and it failed.

A motion to continue voting on planks was made. I voted “aye” and it passed. There was a motion to hear a resolution on a youth outreach committee. I voted “nay” but it passed. On the resolution itself, I voted “aye” and it passed. Someone made a motion to recess. I voted “nay” and it failed. We continued discussing the platform.

We considered the majority vs. minority report on Platform Proposal J. The majority report would have replaced a plank with the text of the First Amendment. The minority report would have added a sentence to the end of the existing language. I voted to end debate and we did. I voted for the majority plank but the minority plank won. We then voted on adopting the minority plank. I voted “nay” and it failed.

OFFICER ELECTIONS

There was a motion to reduce the speaking time for candidates for chair of the LNC from ten to five minutes. I voted on keeping it at ten, but five won. There was a motion to decreasing the time for speeches for nominating candidates for secretary and treasurer. I voted “nay” and it failed.

We then discussed overturning the ruling cutting the time for chair candidates to five minutes. I voted to overturn the ruling and restore the ten minutes. The ruling was overturned and we went back to ten minutes for chair nominating speeches. Apparently someone else made a motion to cut it back to five minutes, which I opposed and it failed.

We then went to speeches by the candidates for chairman. There was a motion to let someone speak on behalf of NOTA6. I voted “aye” but it failed. I believe someone should always be allowed to speak for NOTA. Then there was a motion to overturn the ruling from the chair to allow someone to speak on behalf of NOTA. I voted “aye” and it passed, so someone was allowed to speak for NOTA.

I voted Nick Sarwark for chair. He won on the first ballot.

I voted Alex Merced for vice-chair on the first ballot. I also voted for him on the second ballot, which he won the next day.

There was a motion to extend the meeting until 5:45. I voted “aye” and it passed.

There was a motion to give one of the co-founders of the LP an honorary lifetime membership in the party. I voted “aye” and it passed.

 

Day Three: July 3, 2018

After the second ballot for vice-chair, there was a motion to consider a resolution in support of an Article V convention. I voted “nay” and it failed.

We then heard from the nominees for secretary and treasurer. I voted Caryn Ann Harlos for secretary and Tim Hagan for treasurer. They both won on one ballot.

When we got the results back from the vice-chair election, there was a motion to drop the bottom two vote getters and not just the very bottom vote getter. I voted “nay” because I strongly oppose any changing of rules during an election. The motion failed.

There was a MSR to allow James Weeks to speak, as he was eliminated on the first ballot. I voted “nay” but it passed.

Next there was a motion to consider a resolution to condemn HR-2851, the SITSA Act, currently pending in Congress. I voted “aye” and it passed.

There was a motion to allow Steve Sheetz to address the convention, since he was eliminated from the vice-chair ballot. Since the precedent was set by allowing Weeks to speak, I voted “aye” this time and it passed.

I then voted “aye” in favor of a resolution condemning the oppression of the Venezuelan government. It passed.

Then there was motion for a resolution involving condemning any government retaliation against anyone who wanted to boycott Israel. I think that is what it said. It was long and not put on the screen for anyone to read. Since I could not process exactly what it was doing, I abstained. It passed.

I voted for a resolution thanking everyone for putting on the convention. It passed.

I voted against the “New Orleans Accord” offered up by the anarcho-communists because that is not even a thing. It failed. There was some debate about amending it twice. I voted for the amendments, but they were not enough to save it.

There was a resolution apparently designed to irritate Texas that simply said “Be it resolved, no state is great.” Texas took this very personally. There was discussion7 about what constitutes a “state.” It does not have to refer to the government. It can refer to the geography and culture, too. I voted “nay” on the resolution and it failed.

There was a flurry of resolutions to hand out honorary lifetime memberships in the LP to various people. I voted “aye” on all of them and they all passed.

A well-written and thought out 8 calling for the removal of United States Attorney General Jeff Sessions. There was a motion to delete the reference to a “diety.” I voted “nay” and it failed. There was discussion about amending the statement “because good people smoke marijuana,” because not all good people smoke it. I am pretty sure we changed it to “some good people.” I voted for that. I voted for the final amended version and it passed.

We were starting to get behind on the Orders of the Day. There was a motion to extend the morning session from noon to 12:30. I voted “aye” and it passed.

There was a motion to allow Larry Sharpe to speak at another time during the convention because, for some reason, he was not going to be able to speak at the regularly scheduled time. I voted “aye” and it passed.

There was some motion to overturn the chair, but I did not note for what. I voted for it and it passed.

Regarding the balloting for the At-Large members of the LNC, there was a motion by George Phillies to take the top five vote getters from the first ballot and declare them the winners. Otherwise, we’d have to keep voting until five candidates got more than 50%. I voted “aye” but it failed. Instead, we adopted a proposal to take a voice vote on any candidate in the top five who did not get more than 50%. If those candidates were then approved, they would be elected. I voted “aye.”

We then voted to cut lunch short by half an hour to continue voting for the at-large delegates and the judicial committee. I voted “aye.”

Upon return from lunch, there was a motion to reduce the speaking time for at-large nomination from five to one minute. I said “nay” and it failed. The next motion was to reduce the time from five to three minutes. I said “aye” and it passed.

Sarwark asked if the body objected to him continuing to run the meeting even if was going to speak on behalf of one of the candidates. I thought that OK and voted accordingly. The body agreed and he was allowed to do so.

I voted for the following at-large members of the LNC:

Joe Buchman

Sam Goldstein

Alicia Mattson

Bill Redpath

Chris Thrasher

I voted for the following judicial committee candidates:

Ted Brown

L. Frank Robinson

Mark Hinkle

Blair Dunn

Jim Turney

Roger Roose

I might have also voted for someone named “Murphy,” but I am not sure by looking at my notes.

There was a motion to extend the meeting time an additional thirty minutes in an effort to complete the voting. I voted “aye” and it passed. It was now about 5:00 p.m. and I had to get to the airport to catch my plane back to Denver.

And there you have it. Way too much information about my votes at the New Orleans convention of 2018.

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  1. But, alas, with no Vin Diesel.
  2. Don’t ask about how we went from “E” to “P” because I have no idea. But I am pretty sure there was a reason.
  3. Well, that is what we were discussing when I arrived.
  4. To be clear, my “nay” vote was purely procedural and I supported the plank.
  5. Including civil asset forfeiture.
  6. None of the Above
  7. Yes, really.
  8. By that I mean it was clearly written more than two minutes prior to its introduction.